Monday, May 22

Why Some Companies Are Trying to Hire More People on the Autism Spectrum

Posted: 01/06/17 00:56

Interest in what's called neurodiversity is growing at American companies. This year, the accounting firm EY (formerly known as Ernst & Young) has been piloting a program to employ people with autism in order to explore the benefits of having workers of different cognitive abilities, such as greater productivity and building a more talented workforce. According to a recent study by Drexel University, 58 percent of young adults with autism are unemployed. And yet, many of them have skills that businesses are looking for. "This program leverages the skills that people with high functioning autism often have: looking at data, dealing with mathematical concepts, attention to detail, the ability to focus over long periods of time, and looking at large bodies of information and spotting anomalies," explains Lori Golden, EY Abilities Strategy Leader who led the pilot program. Right now, EY's program has four employees who work as accounting-support associates. Read More